Dr. Jeff Moses Illustrates Typical High-Risk Patient at CHIP Course

ProtectedPCI
February 5, 2016

Nearly 100 interventional and clinical cardiologists from around the country gathered in Fort Lauderdale to collaborate and watch presentations and case reviews from leading physicians in the industry. The course, “CHIP: Hemodynamic Support and Complex PCI” taking place on January 23-24, 2016, was hosted by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation and was organized by leading interventional cardiologists in the field: Drs. Ajay Kirtane, Marty Leon, and Jeffrey Moses from New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, and Dr. John Lasala from Washington University School of Medicine.

Breakout workshops included lessons with the hemodynamic simulator, large bore closure training/simulator, chronic total occlusion (CTO) simulation, and adjunctive devices.
Breakout workshops included lessons with the hemodynamic simulator, large bore closure training/simulator, chronic total occlusion (CTO) simulation, and adjunctive devices.

Dr. Jeff Moses illustrated a typical “CHIP” (Complex Higher risk and Indicated Patients) patient by presenting a case review of a patient with existing ischemic cardiomyopathy who was told there were no options and referred for stem cell therapy. Diagnostic angiography revealed multi-vessel coronary artery disease, and Dr. Moses performed multi-vessel PCI with hemodynamic support using the Impella® heart pump. The outcome was successful.

Next Steps:

  1. Learn more about the hemodynamics of Protected PCI with the Impella 2.5 heart pump
  2. Learn more about the clinical data associated with Protected PCI

About Impella

The Impella 2.5 system is a temporary (<6 hours) ventricular support device indicated for use during high-risk percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) performed in elective or urgent, hemodynamically stable patients with severe coronary artery disease and depressed left ventricular ejection fraction, when a heart team, including a cardiac surgeon, has determined high-risk PCI is the appropriate therapeutic option. Use of the Impella 2.5 in these patients may prevent hemodynamic instability which can result from repeat episodes of reversible myocardial ischemia that occur during planned temporary coronary occlusions and may reduce peri- and post-procedural adverse events.

Protected PCI and use of the Impella 2.5 is not right for every patient. Patients may not be able to be treated with Impella if they have certain pre-existing conditions, which a cardiologist can determine, such as: severe narrowing of the heart valve, severe peripheral artery disease, clots in blood vessels, or a replacement heart valve or certain heart valve deficiencies. Additionally, use of Impella has been associated with risks, including, but not limited to valvular and vascular injury, bleeding, and limb ischemia in certain patients. Learn more about the Impella devices’ approved indications for use, as well as important safety and risk information at www.protectedpci.com/hcp/information/isi.