Tag: CTO


Complex Chronic Total Occlusion

Complex CTO Case with Dr. John Troy Owens Dr. John Troy Owens of Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) presents a case of a 62-year-old male with history of extensive coronary artery disease and prior CABG (LIMA-LAD, SVG-OM, SVG-PDA), severely reduced left ventricular function with history of apical aneurysm and resolved LV thrombus. Additionally, the patient had … Continue reading “Complex Chronic Total Occlusion”

CTO Impact on the Long-Term Prognosis of Ischemic Systolic Heart Failure

Key Takeaways

  • Previous studies indicate the presence of chronic total occlusion (CTO) in hospitalized acute coronary syndrome patients correlates with higher incidences of in-hospital and long-term mortality.
  • This study shows that presence of CTO in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients with ischemic heart failure results in adverse long-term prognosis.
In 2016, the recorded prevalence of heart failure (HF) in the United States was 5.7 million, with an estimated 670,000 new diagnoses each year.1 The rates of post-discharge mortality and readmissions following treatment for HF have remained unchanged, despite the improvement in outcomes of ambulatory HF patents.2 Continue readingCTO Impact on the Long-Term Prognosis of Ischemic Systolic Heart Failure

Retrograde CTO Patient

The University of Washington’s Dr. Ravi Hira shares a case of a low EF patient undergoing a retrograde CTO treated with hemodynamic support using Impella.  Tweet this, subscribe or find educational opportunities near you.

Total Revascularization of High Risk Complex 68-year old Patient: ACC.16 Live Case Wrap-Up

Uwash Live Case #1William L. Lombardi, MD, Mark Reisman, MD, Ravi Hira, MD, and Robert Riley, MD, of the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle presented a live case at ACC.16 on April 2 in which they performed a Protected PCI with Impella on a high-risk patient.The team performed the procedure on a 68-year-old man who was referred for complete percutaneous revascularization and had a history of coronary artery disease and moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Continue readingTotal Revascularization of High Risk Complex 68-year old Patient: ACC.16 Live Case Wrap-Up

CTO PCIs Safe and Successful, Study Shows: ACC. 16

Poster 148 #2Trying again after a failed chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) did not significantly impact the success or safety of subsequent CTO-PCI procedures, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology 2016 Scientific Sessions in Chicago.Reporting on an analysis of 1,213 patients who underwent CTO-PCI procedures between 2012 and 2015 at 12 U.S. centers, Aya J. Alame, BA, and Judit Karacsonyi, MD, said that technical and procedural success rates were similar in the two groups of patients that they and her colleagues from the VA North Texas Healthcare System and UT Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas) and from the University of Szeged (Hungary) focused on for this study. Continue readingCTO PCIs Safe and Successful, Study Shows: ACC. 16

Technical Success of CTO-PCI Not Impacted by Age. ACC. 16

Poster 144 #1Chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures achieved high technical success rates among all age groups examined in a multicenter U.S. registry study of more than 1,000 cases; however, the oldest patients (≥75 years) were more likely than the younger patients to suffer major adverse cardiac events (MACE). The study results were presented April 2 at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions in Chicago.Rahel Iwnetu, MD, and colleagues at the VA North Texas Healthcare System in Dallas studied clinical, angiographic and outcomes data of 1,216 CTO-PCI procedures performed in 1,195 patients whom they grouped by age (<65, 65-74 and ≥75 years). Continue readingTechnical Success of CTO-PCI Not Impacted by Age. ACC. 16

More Complications with Retrograde vs. Antegrade-Only CTO-PCI. ACC. 16

Poster 134 #2Using the retrograde approach in chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with lower success and higher major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) rates compared with an antegrade-only approach, according to study results presented at the American College of Cardiology 2016 Scientific Sessions.“The retrograde approach is integral to the hybrid algorithm for CTO PCI,” said abstract presenter Aris Karatasakis, MD, of the University of Texas Southwestern and VA North Texas Healthcare System in Dallas. “It is essential for achieving high success rates; however, it must be used judiciously due to higher potential for complications.” Continue readingMore Complications with Retrograde vs. Antegrade-Only CTO-PCI. ACC. 16